Minority entrepreneurship

Turn your bright idea into a business: Validate your idea by starting small

This is the third post in a series on how you can turn your dream of owning a small business into a reality. If you missed Part 2 in the series, you can find it here. Check back each week for new posts.

Once you’ve figured out that your business idea has legs and makes financial sense, the next step is to try it out. Many entrepreneurs like to dream big as they’re first launching a business—they picture their business with their own office, retail location and staff. Dreaming big is great, but starting small gives you the opportunity to test out your business ideas and perfect them before investing too heavily. Below are some ways to start small and test your business idea.

Turn your bright idea into a business: Does your small business idea have legs?

This is the first post in our new series about how you can turn your dream of owning a small business into a reality. Check back each week for new posts.

Congratulations! You have a great idea for a new business and want to start your journey as an entrepreneur. But starting a business can seem like a daunting task and you might need some help figuring out if you’re ready to turn your idea into a reality. Read on for tips to help you determine if your business idea has legs.

Validate your idea

What Lyneir Richardson Has Learned About Failure And The Challenges For Minority Entrepreneurs

Lyneir Richardson wears two hats, as an entrepreneur and an academic. Since 2014, he’s been executive director of Rutgers Business School’s Center for Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development, a program that supports women and people of color who are starting their own ventures. He’s also CEO of Chicago TREND, which offers financing and consulting to retail developers in Chicago’s low-income neighborhoods.

Woman- and minority-led small businesses need cash to grow. How to get it.

No money, no growth. Without robust small businesses on the South and West sides, joblessness will continue to plague neighborhoods, experts say.

That's the message from a recent report by the U.S. Senate Committee on Small Business & Entrepreneurship, which found that access to capital remains the primary issue affecting growth of minority-owned businesses nationwide. Only 16 percent of small-business loans went to women in 2013, and less than 2 percent of black-owned businesses received loans that year, the report says.

This Entrepreneur Has Been Thinking About Business and Community Since He Was a Kid

Minority entrepreneurs represent some of the fastest-growing segments of business in the United States today, and make up about 17.5 percent of all employers in the country. Yet they often face a dilemma when it comes to marketing their product: How do they appeal to the widest possible audience while also banking on their background and directing services to the communities they came from?

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