Women's entrepreneurship

Turn your bright idea into a business: Validate your idea by starting small

This is the third post in a series on how you can turn your dream of owning a small business into a reality. If you missed Part 2 in the series, you can find it here. Check back each week for new posts.

Once you’ve figured out that your business idea has legs and makes financial sense, the next step is to try it out. Many entrepreneurs like to dream big as they’re first launching a business—they picture their business with their own office, retail location and staff. Dreaming big is great, but starting small gives you the opportunity to test out your business ideas and perfect them before investing too heavily. Below are some ways to start small and test your business idea.

Turn your bright idea into a business: Does your small business idea have legs?

This is the first post in our new series about how you can turn your dream of owning a small business into a reality. Check back each week for new posts.

Congratulations! You have a great idea for a new business and want to start your journey as an entrepreneur. But starting a business can seem like a daunting task and you might need some help figuring out if you’re ready to turn your idea into a reality. Read on for tips to help you determine if your business idea has legs.

Validate your idea

How to Close the Funding Gap for Female Entrepreneurs

Throughout Women’s History Month, we celebrate the economic, social and political contributions that women make to our world. Women account for roughly half of the American workforce, attain higher levels of education than men and are an increasing share of primary or solo breadwinners. There is no doubt that for America to thrive, we must promote the economic empowerment of women. Central to women’s economic success is women’s entrepreneurship, which contributes significantly to overall economic growth and prosperity.

Women Entrepreneurs May Have More Obstacles to Endure, but There Are a Few Ways to Ensure Success

Entrepreneurship is rarely easy, especially as a female in a typically male-dominated business world. I recently had an opportunity to interview two highly successful business masterminds: Rachel Braun Scherl of SPARK Solutions for Growth, who has nabbed the title of "Vagipreneur" for her success in the female sexual health market, and Sarah Beane Ricca, VP and financial advisor for Morgan Stanley Wealth Management. Both women have sage advice about the practices and philosophies they live by to overcome female-related obstacles and obtain true success.

What Lyneir Richardson Has Learned About Failure And The Challenges For Minority Entrepreneurs

Lyneir Richardson wears two hats, as an entrepreneur and an academic. Since 2014, he’s been executive director of Rutgers Business School’s Center for Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development, a program that supports women and people of color who are starting their own ventures. He’s also CEO of Chicago TREND, which offers financing and consulting to retail developers in Chicago’s low-income neighborhoods.

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